Indianapolis Colts Football

Key to Future 3rd Down Success is Finding Managebale Situations

Posted by Kevin Bowen on December 19, 2013 – 2:20 pm

The slow starts for the Colts offense over the past two months have been difficult to put a finger on.

A lack of execution has been the most frequent answer from many Colts players.

When it boils down though, the inability to sustain drives due to a 5-of-40 third-down performance in first halves is the most alarming number.

That was the case heading into Sunday’s game versus the Houston Texans.

However, a 5-of-5 third-down effort followed in the first quarter and it was no coincidence that led to a 20-3 halftime lead.

Here are a few reasons why the Colts were so successful in the first half on Sunday:

-3rd and manageable: Of the five conversions in the first quarter, four came in third-and-three or smaller situations. The Colts got into those down and distances thanks to plenty of first-down success. The Colts had gains of 7, 0, 7, 5 and 8 yards on first-down during those five conversions. In possessing the ball for 11:05 of the opening quarter, the Colts can point directly to ample first-down success in allowing for more manageable third-down conversions.

-1st down success: Building off that point, the Colts averaged 4.5 yards on their 28 first-down plays on Sunday. The Colts gained at least 5 yards on 11 separate first-down plays against the Texans. A reason why the Colts did not see the same third-down success the rest of the game is that 9 of those 11 plays of at least five yards came in the opening quarter. After the first quarter, the Colts had just two third-downs that were less than a 3rd-and-5 situation. That relates directly to fewer “big” plays on first down.

-Pep Hamilton’s thoughts: The next step for the Colts offense comes in trying to build off the sustained drives they showed early on Sunday. The Kansas City Chiefs are second in the NFL in allowing just 31.9 percent conversions on third-down.

“Having that run/pass threat on third-down makes it more feasible to convert third-downs,” Hamilton said on Thursday. “It’s our goal to be efficient on first and second down and, if there is a third-down, make sure that it’s third-and-short-or-medium.


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Reggie Wayne talks the feeling when he learned of his torn ACL and a possible life after football on radio show

Posted by Kevin Bowen on – 9:00 am

On Tuesday, it was once again the “Reggie Wayne Show” with Queary and Schultz.

The one-hour show aired on WNDE here are some of the highlights from No. 87:

On the fast start on Sunday:

“It was a good game, real good. Our mentality was to come out do the things we’ve been trying to do. That’s to start fast and just keep our foot on the gas pedal. That’s kind of how it was. It was a great team victory, all three phases.”

On the play of Griff Whalen:

“He’s a true professional. He’s what you look for in a teammate. He never pouts. He just waits for his number to get called. He’s been on the active roster. He’s been on the practice squad, been going back and forth. One thing about Griff, he played at Stanford. He’s been with Pep Hamilton. He understands the offense. He knows Andrew pretty good. He can play any position.

“He just sits back, waits on his number to be called. He was doing it all. He was doing offensive stuff. He was returning punts. I think it kind of surprised everybody that he was returning punts. He practiced that all week, got his opportunity and made some great plays for us.”

On the feeling when he found out that he had torn his ACL

“I saw the long face of my head trainer, Dave Hammer, saw a couple of my trainers look at me like, ‘Sorry, dude.’ I already knew what it was. My dark time came from the time (Hammer) told me that I had a torn ACL. From that time it probably went from there until another 2-3 hours. They told me that then I drove home and shared the news with my family and kind of put my head together with my family and figured out what I was going to do from that point on, along with a couple of tears, here and there.

“I played in 189 games in a row, that was tough. That was probably the toughest thing of it. I take so much pride in just answering that bell every week. I just want to be out there with my teammates. That’s why I’m still here. That’s why I’m on the sideline. I just want to be out there with him. That was the toughest thing for me. Then after that it was on to rehab and move forward.”

On if Wayne would ever pursue a career in television after his playing days are over:

“I’m not against it. If the opportunity is right, if the timing is right, I’m all for it. I do also want to enjoy my family. I have beautiful kids, a beautiful wife, who’ve put the sacrifice in throughout my career. I want to make sure that I enjoy every bit of all that stuff. If the opportunity came and the timing and stuff was right, I’m all for it. If not, I’ll be one of those guys with my feet in the sand, on the Corona commercial.”


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Dwayne Allen talks about the pain of sitting on the sidelines

Posted by Kevin Bowen on November 14, 2013 – 9:00 am

While Dwayne Allen deals with the physical pain of not being able to play football, it’s the mental agony of watching his team each week that eats at the second-year tight end.

“There’s really nothing I can do but I feel like I’m letting my teammates down in certain situations,” Allen said on “The Ride with JMV” last week.

“Whether it’s a spark to help out the run game or it’s a third-down catch that I can provide. It’s been a struggle all year. I was ready to have not only a breakout season, but a Pro Bowl season and I felt like I was totally capable of doing that.”

The usage of the tight end position in Pep Hamilton’s offense was intriguing to Allen all offseason.

Allen was anxious to be employed in a variety of ways and he admits the offense he sees in the regular season doesn’t compare to that during OTAs and training camp.

“This offense is a fraction of what it was in the spring and that’s just because of personnel,” Allen said.

“Pep Hamilton has done a great job of earning his paycheck because here’s a first-year offensive coordinator and five of his offensive starters go down.”

While Allen is away from the playing field, he’s seen almost daily at the Indiana Farm Bureau Football Center.

Along with rehabbing and taking part in team meetings, Allen has also taken a position as a player executive with the non-profit Dream Alive Inc.

Former Colts offensive tackle Tarik Glenn spearheads the organization which helps service inner-city youth.

When game time arises each week, Allen is filled with mixed emotions but he could not be happier in seeing the effort from a group that 6-3 despite missing five of their top offensive players.

“That’s the way we were built,” Allen says of the “Next-man Up” culture.

“You go back to last year, our head coach goes down. Coach Pagano goes down, Bruce Arians is promoted to interim head coach and he’s able to lead us to a 9-3 record and also to the playoffs. That’s our culture. It’s ingrained in us.”


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Pep Hamilton’s bye week plans took a bit of a turn when Reggie Wayne went down

Posted by Kevin Bowen on November 1, 2013 – 3:00 pm

Pep Hamilton wasn’t expecting to spend his bye week in this fashion.

Instead of reviewing film of the first two months of the season and getting a head start on the Houston Texans, Hamilton also dealt with the task of preparing for life without Reggie Wayne.

“It’s one of the harsh realities of the National Football League. It was tough to say the least,” Hamilton said of Wayne’s absence.

“We feel like we got to find ways, even if it’s by committee, to continue to move the ball and continue to move the ball in the passing game and be effective as a passing offense without Reggie. Andrew (Luck) had a tremendous amount of trust in Reggie and knowing that Reggie would get to the spot and ultimately that Reggie would make the play. We feel like we’ve got some other guys that are very capable of stepping in and making plays for us.”

Another area that Hamilton focused on during the bye week was creating more chances for new running back Trent Richardson.

Without Wayne, Hamilton knows that more attention will move towards opponents stopping the Colts run game.

“I have to do a better job of coming up with schemes that not only give our offensive line a chance to be successful, but of course to create holes for Trent. Create schemes that complement his wealth of talent,” Hamilton said on Thursday.

“That’s one of the things that we spent time as an offensive staff just looking at during the bye week. Finding ways to better feature our playmakers. Not just Trent, but Donald (Brown) and T.Y. (Hilton) and DHB (Darrius Heyward-Bey) and Coby Fleener and Stanley Havili for that matter. But yes, I have to do a better job of finding ways to get Trent out in space.”

The last time Wayne missed a game with the Colts, Hamilton was a 27-year old offensive coordinator at Howard University, his alma mater.

His game plans for the rest of 2013 won’t include No. 87 but that doesn’t change the goals for this offense.

“We feel like even up until this point we’ve been an offense by committee. We’ve had a lot of different guys step up and make plays for us,” Hamilton said.

“We just know moving forward that it’s the next man up. DHB (Darrius Heyward-Bey), T.Y. (Hilton), some of the younger guys that may get an opportunity to go in there and make plays for us in the passing game. Somebody is going to have to step up and make the plays.”


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Colts Daily Headlines: October 18th Edition

Posted by Kevin Bowen on October 18, 2013 – 8:45 am

The Colts will conclude their practice schedule for Denver later this morning. Today’s news looks at Robert Mathis facing his former teammate and Pep Hamilton’s game plan this week.

Take a look below at the top pieces from Friday, October 18th.  

Colts LB Robert Mathis finally gets to hit Peyton Manning

By: Stephen Holder, Indy Star

This time there will be no one in a Colts shirt that will reprimand Robert Mathis for hitting Peyton Manning on Sunday night.

Tempting as it might have been, Robert Mathis always knew the price for hitting Peyton Manning during any of the thousands of practice sessions in which they faced off was much too high.

“If you come within two yards of him, you might get cut,” Mathis joked Thursday. “That’s just the truth.”

The Indianapolis Colts outside linebacker has registered an astounding 101 sacks in an illustrious 11-season career. But he has never laid a finger on Manning, who is superior to any of the dozens of quarterbacks Mathis has taken down. Mathis finally gets the chance Sunday night when the Denver Broncos visit Lucas Oil Stadium in an AFC showdown pitting Manning against his former team.

Quarterbacks are considered off limits in practice in the NFL, and any player who makes contact with one will learn a difficult lesson. Coaches have been known to throw players out of practice for such a violation. That’s all the more true when that player is Manning, the personification of a franchise quarterback.

Just ask Mathis, who once nearly made what might have been a career-altering mistake.

“I came pretty close (to hitting Manning) my rookie year,” Mathis sheepishly admitted. “I got an earful from more than just the coaches. You learn from it.”

Colts’ Hamilton hoping to grind out long drives against Broncos

By: Tom James, The Terre Haute Tribune

Even though Pep Hamilton won’t be game planning against Peyton Manning this week, what he does from a play calling standpoint could dictate the impact for the 16-year veteran.

As for Hamilton’s gameplan, it’s relatively simple. Play keep away. Limit the number of opportunities that Denver’s offense is on the field. Don’t get into a play-for-play, point-for-point scenario. Control the tempo.

“It’s important for us to control the line of scrimmage and establish a running game. I feel like that’s the formula that works for us,” Hamilton said Thursday.

“We had a few games where we won the time-of-possession battle and as we all know in this room, we didn’t do that this past Monday night [in a 19-9 loss at San Diego]. We feel like it’s important that we control the line of scrimmage.”

But while the plan is pretty basic, executing it will be the tough part.

“Quite naturally, the game and the score of the game will dictate what we’re able to do offensively. So the flow of the game, it’ll kind of take care of itself,” the Colts’ assistant coach said. “It’s our goal as an offense to, at the end of the game, have at least one more point than the opponent and have a chance to win the game, of course.”


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Colts Daily Headlines: October 14th Edition

Posted by Kevin Bowen on October 14, 2013 – 8:39 am

It’s Monday and the Colts are less than 12 hours away from Monday Night Football. Today’s news looks at Trent Richardson staying on schedule and Reggie Wayne approaching yet another milestone.

Take a look below at the top pieces from Monday, October 14th.  

Colts say Trent Richardson is on schedule

By: Mike Wells, AFC South Blog

Trent Richardson hasn’t been with the Colts for even a month and his coaches believe that the second-year running back is right on schedule.

“I’ll say it again, he’s on schedule,” Colts offensive coordinator Pep Hamilton said. “He had some big runs for us late in that game. That third-and-5, that was a huge play in the fourth quarter. For him to really put his head down and found a way to grind out the five yards we needed for the first down. He’s on schedule. He’s very much confident and competent in his ability to go out there and execute our offense. He’s made some plays for us.”

Richardson, who has rushed for 151 yards on 51 carries in three games with the Colts, echoed Hamilton’s words.

“People have been on us about the running game and it’s going to come,” Richardson said. “When it does come, it’s going to come hard. We’re going to have a lot of bandwagoners and we don’t need all that. When it does come, it’s going to come hard and it’s going to come fast, too.”

Reggie Wayne about to join elite company

By: Mike Wells, ESPN.com

When Reggie Wayne entered the NFL, he wanted to keep all the footballs that were part of special moments.

Now, just four catches away from 1,000, Wayne laughs at the idea.

“I guess I didn’t think that through,” Wayne said, laughing. “I should have known I was going to catch more than eight touchdowns. My wife looked up and she was like, ‘You’re just going to have a wall of footballs.’ I had to stop that. Now they’re in a big pile. Every once in a while I go through them and look at them and try to remember that catch. I’ve never been good at that.”

Wayne will have to find some space for the ball he catches for his fourth reception in Monday’s game against the San Diego Chargers.

He’s four catches shy of becoming the ninth player in league history with at least 1,000 career receptions. Former Colts receiver Marvin Harrison is third on the list with 1,102 catches.

“When I first got in, I just wanted to feel like I was part of the family,” Wayne said. “You don’t look down 13 years later and expect yourself to still be playing. A thousand catches, that’s not something I ever dreamed of. It’s kind of a weird feeling. It feels kind of weird to talk about it. But I’m happy. I guess that just shows that I’ve been playing for a long time.”


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Pagano talks win over Seattle, home crowd, and the contributions of Hilton/Mathis on weekly radio show

Posted by Kevin Bowen on October 8, 2013 – 12:00 pm

With the regular season back in action, the Chuck Pagano show returns hosted by ‘Voice of the Colts’ Bob Lamey on Monday nights.

Here’s some of the highlights from Pagano’s show on Monday night following the Colts 34-28 win over the Seahawks:

On how the Colts pulled it off on Sunday:

“We knew it was going to be a 15-round heavyweight fight so to speak. We made a huge emphasis, we knew this team was outscoring their opponents 44-7 in the fourth quarter and we were outscoring our opponents 24-7 in the fourth quarter and we knew if we got it late in the fourth quarter, we had to win that quarter. Once again our guys came through and I think we outscored them 11-0 in the fourth and held the ball for over 12 (12:11) minutes. That was really the difference in the ball game.”

On the crowd at Lucas Oil Stadium on Sunday:

“It was great the whole ball game but that last series for them, that place was deafening. Again, I can’t thank our fans enough. They made a huge difference. Again, we talked about the timeout situation and them not having any. I don’t know what you point a finger on but they play a hand in that. They didn’t have any timeouts because they had to burn them. Them not having any timeouts at the end of the game makes a huge difference.”

On T.Y.’s Hilton’s 73-yard touchdown late in the first quarter:

“We hadn’t really taken a shot so to speak down the field. They were obviously loading the box. I think we had just gotten a first down. I think it was our first first down. They got cover corners, a great free safety, all that sort of stuff but we tried to loosen them up a little bit because of them playing eight in the box. A great call by our offensive guys and Pep (Hamilton) and T.Y. ran a great route. I think Andrew got rid of the ball just in time. I think he took a little bit of a shot on the play and put it right on the money and then the run after the catch was unbelievable.”

On Robert Mathis becoming the 30th player in NFL history to reach the 100-sack plateau:

“Unbelievable. To reach that mark is a testament Robert’s work ethic, his character, his integrity. We said last night in the locker room, he’s a pro’s pro, a man’s man. If I had a son, I would want him to be just like Robert. He does all the right things and he’s just a great football player, but he’s a better person and I couldn’t be happier for Robert.”

On the Colts play during the 2nd half the past few weeks:

“I think it comes down to these guys prepare really well. These guys practice hard. We try to push each other. They push each other in practice so the game actually slows down for them. It’s a little bit easier. From a preparation standpoint, that’s huge. Our guys just stick to the process. They don’t get away from the things that help you win ball games, help you extend drives, help you get off the field on third downs. They seem to get stronger as the game goes longer.

On the Colts defense and how they are continuing to grow:

“I think these guys are just starting to scratch the surface to be honest with you. They’ve put the time in. They are going about their business the right way. They prepare. They work hard at practice. They are becoming more familiar with the defense, the terminology and are trusting of one another, playing together, doing their job and taking care of their business. They love playing. We have a bunch of guys out there that love playing football. They love getting after you. They have the right mindset. They play with the right physicality that you need to play with. They love winning and they love beating guys down. We have an aggressive group and hopefully we can keep going in the right direction.”


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Colts Daily Headlines: October 2nd Edition

Posted by Kevin Bowen on October 2, 2013 – 8:35 am

The Colts will get back on the practice field this afternoon in preparation of the Seattle Seahawks. Today’s news looks at the growth of Coby Fleener and how the Colts have dealt with injuries.

Take a look below at the top pieces from Wednesday, October 2nd.  

Colts TE Coby Fleener has gone from injuries and drops to wide-open touchdown catches this season

By: Mike Chappell, Indy Star

The growth of Coby Fleener has been a key factor in the Colts turning in a 3-1 month of September.

Fleener being at the top of his game was critical. Two-tight end formations are prominent in coordinator Pep Hamilton’s offense but the team lost Dwayne Allen to a season-ending hip injury in the season-opener against Oakland. Along with remaining a viable option in the passing game, he’s being asked to amp up his contributions as a blocker, which had been Allen’s forte.

“Anytime a guy like Dwayne goes down who makes such a big impact for the offense, other guys are going to have to fill in here and there,” Fleener said. “So yeah, I would say my role has expanded a bit.”

Added coach Chuck Pagano: “We always knew what he was in the passing game. What a threat. We’re asking him to do a little bit more heavy lifting in the run game and he’s responding. He’s getting better.”

Colts Insider: Can Indianapolis continue to weather its rash of injuries?

By: Stephen Holder, Indy Star

Holder looks at the Colts injury issues and how the team has overcome some significant absences early on in 2013.

The Colts’ injury list just keeps growing, with the latest additions being outside linebacker Bjoern Werner and fullback Stanley Havili. Those are key losses, but given the way the Colts have weathered their previous injuries, it’s understandable if you feel confident they’ll come through this latest test with flying colors, too.

We’ve addressed this story before, but it’s worth repeating. It’s absolutely remarkable the way the Colts have pushed through their rash of injuries. They lost three starters to season-ending injured reserve in the first two weeks of the season (Vick Ballard, Donald Thomas and Dwayne Allen), and several key starters have missed games – safety LaRon Landry (2), running back Ahmad Bradshaw (1), center Samson Satele (2), inside linebacker Pat Angerer (2) and defensive end Ricky Jean-Francois (1) among them.

The Colts’ depth has shown during this stretch. Backups like safety Delano Howell, offensive lineman Jeff Linkenbach, defensive end Fili Moala and Kelvin Sheppard deserve credit. There hasn’t been an obvious drop in performance in most cases where starters have been sidelined, and that’s rarely the case in the NFL. There has been less consistency in some instances, but the overall performance level has been impressive.


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Five Things Learned, Colts-San Francisco

Posted by craigkelleycolts on September 23, 2013 – 9:28 am

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Intro:  Indianapolis posted a dominant 27-7 win at San Francisco on Sunday.  The Colts ran 12 more times than they threw and earned their most lop-sided road victory since 2009.  Facing a physical defending Super Bowl team, the Colts were more physical.

INDIANAPOLIS – The Colts answered a tough home setback by meeting the challenge of their first road game with a 20-point victory margin over a team (San Francisco) that made the Super Bowl last year and nearly did the previous season.

The Colts met a physical opponent by being even more so.  On a national television stage, Indianapolis showed a much different blueprint for victory than past seasons have had.

Colts 27, San Francisco 7.

Here are FIVE THINGS LEARNED.

LET’S GET PHYSICAL – Nothing is more telling than the words of an owner.  In this case, Jim Irsay, “To bring in Ahmad Bradshaw and now to have Trent Richardson…You can see Trent with his lateral movement, his explosion, he’s always going forward.  What we’re looking for is what we saw today.”  When Irsay changed his organizational dynamic in early 2012 by bringing in Ryan Grigson and Chuck Pagano, the new duo spoke of a different style of play.  Every move since then has reflected that approach and progress made over 18 games prior to yesterday was incremental.  Yesterday, it was dramatic.  The Colts ran 12 more times than they threw, a first for that disparity since 2011.  The Colts are 4-0 in the last 19 games when they have rushed more often than thrown, and they are 4-0 in games in that span when out-rushing opponents by 59 yards.  “Run and stop the run” has been a mantra.  It was reality yesterday.  It is a much different feeling for long-time Colts fans.  This new pair of shoes could be broken in quickly.

1-2 PUNCH, AND MORE – Ahmad Bradshaw carried 19 times for 95 yards.  Trent Richardson had 13 carries for 35 yards.  Bradshaw said the plan never was to ease his new buddy in, “We’ve got a one-two punch and we used it.  It’s going to be tough for a lot of opponents this year.”  The duo had 32 of the team’s 39 rushes.  Get used to it.  Pep Hamilton mentioned Friday that Donald Brown would be in the mix.  Brown had 25 yards on three carries, including a 16-yarder for a first down that led to a field goal.  Indianapolis has a more pronounced “hammer” look to the offense.  Pagano spoke 20 months ago of the Colts having an AFC North look (like that of Pittsburgh and Baltimore).  That was the look at San Francisco.

MULTI-POSITIONAL OFFENSIVE LINEMEN – The offensive line had one of its grittiest and most productive performances of recent memory.  Mike McGlynn shifted to center for the injured Samson Satele (the third time he has done this in 19 games), and played well.  He competed successfully while being battered all game.  Jeff Linkenbach showed his versatility again by starting at right guard for McGlynn.  In 29 career starts, Linkenbach has opened five times at LT, four at LG, four at RG and 16 at RT.  Mixed in among stalwart veterans Anthony Castonzo and Gosder Cherilus was rookie left guard Hugh Thornton.  Versatility among all linemen provides big-time currency for the offense.  Often is it not acknowledged, but Sunday it was on full display.  They ventured into Candlestick and shined.  Well done, gents.

VALUE OF KICKERS, COVERAGE, FIELD POSITION – San Francisco started nine of its 11 possessions at or inside its 20.  Pat McAfee reached the end zone on four of his six kickoffs, producing three touchbacks.  The other three returns reached the 13, 11 and 12.  McAfee pinned the 49ers to their eight (twice) and nine with three of his four punts.  Adam Vinatieri hit clutch efforts from 43 and 41 yards, and his lone miss from 51 yards was wide while attempted into the wind.  The Colts won the average field position drive start by eight yards, and three-of-five three-and-outs defensively for Indianapolis came after solid kicks.  Again, a part of the game sometimes overlooked.  Not today.  It was probably great flights home for special teams and offensive line coaches.

BELIEVE IN COACHES – Defensive players heard it for two weeks after Terrelle Pryor ran for 112 yards.  With Colin Kaepernick and Russell Wilson looming in the next month, getting squared away on a diverse offense was necessary.  Chuck Pagano said research was done and that players would be prepared.  Kaepernick rushed seven times for 20 yards, and the only TD run by a quarterback belonged to Andrew Luck.  The phrase heard after Sunday’s win was “assignment football.”  Assignments were sound and execution was solid.  The Colts are 13-6 under the new regime, with players buying in and competing for each other.  They’re coachable, and everyone enjoyed the fruits of a decisive win.


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Colts Daily Headlines: September 18th Edition

Posted by Kevin Bowen on September 18, 2013 – 8:29 am

The Colts practice schedule for the 49ers begins this afternoon. Today’s news is pretty quiet but here are a couple of observational pieces on Ahmad Bradshaw and Pep Hamilton’s offense.

Take a look below at the top pieces from Wednesday, September 18th.  

Colts Insider: Ahmad Bradshaw’s performance a silver lining in Colts’ loss

By: Stephen Holder, Indy Star

Holder points to the play of new running back Ahmad Bradshaw as a positive from Sunday’s game.

But now that we’ve gotten a closer look at Bradshaw, here are my observations.

* He’s got good vision. Bradshaw’s ability to both follow blocks and anticipate how a play will unfold allowed him to pick up extra yards that he otherwise might not have. Bradshaw showed a knack for knowing there the crease was going to be, often before it even developed. This allowed the Colts to move the chains even in instances where they didn’t necessarily have perfect run blocking.

* Bradshaw had a lot more pop than I expected. He showed, perhaps, more quickness than we gave him credit for, and that allowed him to hit the hole the moment it opened.

* Finally, Bradshaw still has that trademark toughness we’ve always seen from him. Put simply, he runs hard, punishing defenders who dare try to tackle him.

Some early assumptions about Colts offense under coordinator Pep Hamilton have proven true

By: Mike Chappell, Indy Star

Chappell also gives some observations and his come on the offensive side of the ball looking at Pep Hamilton’s scheme.

• “Chunk plays,” the over-the-top strikes so prevalent in 2012, will be less frequent.

After two games, Colts receivers rank 16th in the league, averaging 11.6 yards per reception. They were No. 3 last season, averaging 12.9 yards, the club’s sixth-best per-catch average since 1970.

Only three of Andrew Luck’s 43 completions have gained at least 25 yards, tied for eighth-fewest in the league. Philadelphia’s Michael Vick has a league-high 10 and Green Bay’s Aaron Rodgers nine.

• When chunk plays occur, T.Y. Hilton figures to be the target on the majority of them.

Among receivers with at least nine receptions, Hilton’s 16.2 average ranks 13th. His acrobatic 47-yard grab against the Miami Dolphins is Luck’s longest completion this season, and the latest evidence that coordinator Pep Hamilton should maximize Hilton’s big-play skills.

 


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